Cookie Season is Upon Us!

C:\Users\jdelp\Downloads\Sign Cookie Season.png

Now, more than ever, the comfort and familiarity of biting into a delicious Girl Scout Cookie is needed. Our Girl Scouts are ready to build their business, reach their goals, and meet the cookie demand! 

Girl Scouts in the Heart of Pennsylvania will begin selling cookies on January 15th. Girls will have their order cards until February 12th to take orders AND will be creating their cookie website so customers can order online. Customers can even order online and skip the shipping fee by choosing in-person girl delivery until February 12th. (Those cookies will arrive in March) 

Cookies will arrive in mid-March. Girls will fulfill their orders and then can go out into the world, safely of course, to continue reaching their goals! Contactless payment and delivery is an option all season long!  

C:\Users\jdelp\Downloads\Girl in T-Shirt (4).png

The cookie season ends on April 11th. Customers should make sure to stock up! Girl Scout Cookies are great in various recipes (find some hereand they freeze well! 

Here is GSHPA’s Cookie Line Up for 2021:  

C:\Users\jdelp\Downloads\Box Lineup 8.png

Ready to buy some cookies?! Beginning Friday, January 15th, you can go to our website and found out where to get cookies in your area!


Post by Jess Delp

GSHPA Holiday Traditions

We love to CELEBRATE! We hope it won’t be too surprising to know that the staff here at GSHPA like to have fun in creative and unique ways with our friends and families!  

Girl Scouts in the Heart of PA has an amazing staff and we are so grateful to work alongside so many wonderful Girl Scout volunteers and girls! We are a fun and diverse group of people, who come from very different backgrounds, but when we come together, we are a family!  

We have asked our staff to share some of their favorite holiday traditions to celebrate this time of year! We hope as you read these traditions you will find entertainment, joy and a better understanding of what makes Girl Scouts in the Heart of PA so special!  

So grab a hot chocolate and enjoy! You may even want to grab a pen and paper to take notes so you can try out some of our traditions as well!  

And don’t forget to share some of your traditions in the comments! We would love to hear them!  

Favorite Holiday Tradition Growing Up 

My family has always been very into the holiday season, so we have many traditions! One of my absolute favorites is baking Christmas Cookies with my mom. We would make dozens and dozens of cookies to give to our friends and family. While my mom and I spent the evening baking cookies my dad would spend his time wrapping presents, so we would ring a little bell after each batch so he knew our official “Christmas Cookie Taste Tester” should make an appearance!  -Rebekah Stefl (Sr. Volunteer Support Coordinator)  

My mother hand knit my Christmas stocking and we’d hang them by the fireplace, I still have that stocking. My daughter’s stocking was knit by my late mother in law so we hang them on the mantle each year. I love the history and care taken with each one. Love was knitted into these heirlooms. –Diane Bateman (Member Services Specialist) 

There are so many. Every Christmas Eve, my mom would get my sister and I matching pajamas. That was the only gift that we could open early. I have continued the tradition with my kids.  –Janelle Brewer (Volunteer Training Manager)  

My mom loved holidays. My favorite memories with her are from holidays, particularly Christmas. My favorite thing about Christmas morning was opening my stocking. I still love stockings (although I do not get them very often as an adult). My mom would also get me and my sister a chocolate advent calendar every year. This year I got a dog treat advent calendar for Libby! On Christmas morning I would eat my last chocolate, open my stocking and then my presents! Santa’s gifts were always unwrapped right under the tree. Family’s gifts were wrapped. There were always magical snowy Santa boot prints by our fireplace. (My mom would use my stepdad’s boots and sprinkle flour around them).  – Jess Delp (Director of Product Program and Retail)  

Grateful for Parents 

My parents would always take off work and spend time with me through my holiday break. There were many movie marathons when I was younger and it is something we still do today.  –Erica Hildabridle (Member Registration Specialist)  

My mom always made homemade sticky buns, and still does even though we’re out of the house!  -Olivia Novak (Volunteer Support Coordinator)  

Mom was diligent about keeping traditions solid year to year. Now that she’s gone, things are kept the same even more in our effort to hand on to her presence.  –Jenny Boyles (Member Registration Specialist)  

I am grateful for so many things my parents did around the holidays! I think the thing I’m most grateful for is that over the years my dad would make these adorable holiday home movies and take a million photos. And it has been wonderful to have them to look back on!  -Rebekah Stefl (Sr. Volunteer Support Coordinator)  

They always decorated the house to the nines to make things festive, and made sure that we had special family time all day.  –Colleen Sypien (Volunteer Support Coordinator)  

Favorite Holiday Food 

I love them all!!!! One that I particularly like is collard greens – my husband’s grandmother showed me how to make them and they are sooooo good!  -Adia Walker (Regional Director)  

My favorite is an apple pie that I’ve been making for 28 years…so I guess I make it best so people tell me. Even after all the turkey, stuffing, potatoes, they make room for this pie.  –Diane Bateman (Member Services Specialist)  

Pfauenaugen, don’t use google translate directly, since it translates as Peacock eyes. It is a type of cookie, essentially two shortbreads with jam in the middle. –Lisa Schweier (Member Services Manager)  

All of our Christmas cookie recipes are my favorites. They’ve come down through the generations and have been made into a book for each of the kids in the new generation.  –Jenny Boyles (Member Registration Specialist)  

Sweet Potato Casserole. My husband makes it best!  -Sheri Kline (Volunteer Support Coordinator)  

Holiday Heirlooms Passed Down 

There is a menorah that my grandfather used every Hanukkah from the time my mom and uncle were little that passed on to me when I had my daughter 28 years ago. I still have it and we still light it, every year in memory of my grandfather.  –Sheri Kline (Volunteer Support Coordinator)  

Each year, my grandmother would buy all of us grandkids shiny metal Christmas ornaments with our names and the year engraved. I still decorate my tree with these every year and they always bring back the magic of my Grandma’s presence over the holidays.  –Adia Walker (Regional Director)  

Our family traditionally passes down ornaments from generation to generation. We love to display them, but we usually put them in a special place rather than on the tree so they are not accidentally broken. Our oldest ornament to date is from the 1700s!  -Rebekah Stefl (Sr. Volunteer Support Coordinator)  

Those Christmas Stockings….Also, my grandmother gave me a Raggedy Anne doll for my first Christmas and I’ve been collecting dolls ever since. That poor thing has been chewed on by the dog, lost tug of war with my little brother(her arms and legs have been sewed back on so many times)…I even temporarily lost her at Karns and mom had to go back for her….trauma happened without her with me. She came to college with me and yes, I still have her.  –Diane Bateman (Member Services Specialist)  

We have a melted snowman candle that is so ugly but was the first Christmas decoration my parents bought together when they were a young married couple. He’s a treasure.  –Jenny Boyles (Member Registration Specialist)  

At my Dad’s house I have a stocking that my grandma knit for me. She used stretchy fabric so it is HUGE and is never quite full because it just keeps stretching the more items are put in it.  –Jess Delp (Director of Product Program and Retail)  

5 years ago my family and I started getting live trees for our Christmas tree. They are a bit smaller than traditional Christmas trees but we plant them after the holiday and watch them grow long after! It is so fun watch the trees grow and have a living memory from that holiday. – Gabby Dietrich (Community Initiatives Coordinator)

Favorite Gift Given or Received 

A journal/book to my mother that asks her about her childhood, life experiences, and so much more. It will be great to have and show future generations.  –Olivia Novak (Volunteer Support Coordinator)  

I bought my mom a birthstone bracelet. It was the first “real” gift I ever bought after I started working and it was a bracelet that she wanted but would never buy for herself. She wore it every day until she died.  –Sheri Kline (Volunteer Support Coordinator)  

Boxing gloves and punching bag – it really helps me get through the tough times.  –Adia Walker (Regional Director)  

I really enjoy giving presents to people, but I think my favorite is a present from last year. I had just taught myself to crochet and I spent countless hours crocheting a large fluffy blanket to gift my parents for Christmas!  -Rebekah Stefl (Sr. Volunteer Support Coordinator)  

A science kit/set that I made for my cousin that had instructions and materials for DIY science experiments. I went all out for it and included test tubes and fun experiments that played off of the things he liked at the time.  –Colleen Sypien (Volunteer Support Coordinator)  

For me, I love giving gifts, not gift cards, a real, wrapped up in paper, bows the whole package. If I can get a smile from someone when they open that and they go, aw wow, I love it! That to me means the world. Not so much the gift itself, but the fact that they liked it…if that makes sense? This gets harder to do as they get older.  –Diane Bateman (Member Services Specialist)  

I made my brother 4 Game of Throne glasses. It was a challenge to make them but also a lot of fun and he definitely loved them as he asked for 8 more. –Lisa Schweier (Member Services Manager)  

I love giving gifts. I have so many favorites that I have given but the ultimate was probably a ceramic Christmas tree that lights up. I painted it for my aunt. She was so pleased with it despite the fact that I couldn’t wrap it properly because it was so big, I gave it to her in a reusable shopping bag. But she puts it up every year right inside her house. It is the first thing you see.  –Erica Hildabridle (Member Registration Specialist)  

Every gift that I have ever given to my son, Justice, because he was always so grateful and his face lit up no matter what it was, haha. He would literally say to everything – it’s just what I wanted.  –Nicole Negron (Volunteer Support Coordinator)  

Last year I gave my daughters a trip to Vermont. They love the movie “White Christmas” so this was an exciting first for them. And just like in the movie, when we got to Vermont, there was no snow!  -Jenny Boyles (Member Registration Specialist)  

We gave invitations to my daughter’s adoption day in court to our families! –Janelle Brewer (Volunteer Training Manager)  

We hope you enjoyed getting to know us a little better! Please share your traditions so we can get to know you!  May your celebrations be filled with hope, joy, and good food! 

National Brownie Day

Did you know December 8th is National Brownie Day? Well, now you know! Every year, the delicious desserts we recognize as brownies are celebrated on December 8th. As Girl Scouts, we know this tasty dessert is not the only “brownie” that deserves to be celebrated! Brownies, the second program level in Girl Scouts, is open to girls in grades 2-3. So why not take National Brownie Day to celebrate both the scrumptious and the scouting?   

Check out these 5 easy ways to celebrate National Brownie Day with your favorite Brownies this year!  

  1. Bake and eat brownies with a Girl Scout twist! Enjoy some warm, chocolatey brownies with your favorite Girl Scout cookie added to the mix!  
  1. Explore the history behind brownies! Have you ever wondered how brownies came to be? National Brownie Day is the perfect day to explore the history of each one! We recommend starting with the chocolatey dessert! You can take this time to research who invented them and how they became such a classic dessert! Can you guess the 5 ingredients that make up the classic brownie recipe?  

Additionally, you can have fun learning about how Girl Scouts became known as “Brownies”. Did you know that Girl Scout Brownies were originally called “Rosebuds,” but the name was later changed? The term “Brownies” was suggested by Lord Robert Baden-Powell, a close friend of Juliette Gordon Low. The term was originally used in folktales to describe small individuals who were both helpful and magical, also known as fairies! Various versions of these classic stories have been included in the Brownie handbooks over the years, and they are the basis for the traditional Brownie investiture ceremony. Check out the Brownie Story here.   

  1. Learn a Girl Scout brownie song and make a new one! As Girl Scouts, we love to get together with our friends and sing. Learn the “Brownie Smile” song below and then try creating your very own song! Maybe you can even include lyrics about your favorite brownie desserts! 
  1. Make brownie inspired SWAPS! SWAPS stands for “Special Whatchamacallits Affectionately Pinned Somewhere”. Traditionally, these are made by Girl Scouts to exchange with others as tokens of friendship! So to celebrate National Brownie Day try making brownie inspired SWAPS. If you would like to recreate the one pictured you will just need a sponge, construction paper, brown paint, writing tool, and glue!  
  1. Recognize a special brownie in your life! It’s National Brownie Day? What better day to thank a Girl Scout Brownie with a nice treat! Make a card or write a letter for a helper making your life sweeter!  

Post by Gabby Dietrich

Fall Traditions: Girl Scout Promise and Law

Girl Scout Traditions provide both girls and adults with a sense of history, connection and belonging. One tradition at the very center of Girl Scouting is following the Girl Scout Promise and Girl Scout Law. Both the Girl Scout Promise and Law guide Girl Scouts through the mission of building girls of courage, confidence and character who make the world a better place.  

Reciting the Girl Scout Promise and Law can be easily included in most meetings, ceremonies, special events and virtual gatherings. They serve as great ways to check in with the troop about the true meaning of being a Girl Scout. While it is important to help the girls learn the Girl Scout Promise and Law it can also be a fun way to complete a step towards the Girl Scout Way badge as well!  

The Basics 

When saying the Girl Scout Promise you should start by making the Girl Scout Sign. To begin raise three fingers of the right hand then use your thumb to hold down the pinky finger. The three fingers represent the three parts of the promise.  

Girl Scout Promise (Learn and follow along with GSHPA Girl Scouts here)

On my honor, I will try:  
     to serve God* and my country, 
     to help people at all times,  
     and to live by the Girl Scout Law

*members can substitute wording appropriate to their own spiritual beliefs  

Girl Scout Law (Learn and follow along with GSHPA Girl Scouts here)

   I will do my best to be 
       honest and fair, 
       friendly and helpful, 
       considerate and caring,  
       courageous and strong, and 
      responsible for what I say and do,  
     and to   
      respect myself and others,  
      respect authority, 
     use resources wisely, 
     make the world a better place, and  
     be a sister to every Girl Scout.
  

Here are 3 fun activities you can do to help your girls learn the Girl Scout Promise and Girl Scout Law!  

Girl Scout Paper Sign 

Materials: construction paper, GS Promise trefoil cut outs, scissors, tape/glue, pencils, and markers/crayons. 

Directions:  

  1. Each girl will need 1 piece of paper to start. They place their hand flat on the paper then begin tracing their hand with the pencil. Once traced they will want to cut it out.  If easier you can provide your girls with a preprinted/traced hand they can simply cut out instead!  
  1. Then fold/bend the pinky and thumb until they meet in the middle to create the Girl Scout Sign.  
  1. After that have your girls cut out and decorate trefoil cut outs which include the GS Promise.  
  1. Then tape/Glue both the hand and trefoil onto a piece of construction paper. After everything is attached they can also decorate their creation! 
  1. Afterwards have them over the promise individually or together so the girls learn it by heart. 
  1. Try making the hand gesture/symbol with their own hands, now that they see how it’s supposed to look with the paper! 

Girl Scout Law Popsicle Hanger 

Materials: 12 Popsicle Sticks (per girl), ribbon, colored pencils/crayons, a marker, and glue.  

Directions: 

  1. Once each girl has her materials, have her write the Girl Scout Law on the 12 Popsicle sticks with her marker.  
  1. After the writing out the Girl Scout Law, color each stick a different color. 
  1. When the Popsicle sticks are colored you will then glue them onto a piece of ribbon in the order they are said when reciting the Girl Scout Law. If you would like hang up your Girl Scout Law simply make a “U” shape out of the ribbon with the round curve at the top. Then add your Girl Scout Law sticks!  
  1. After the glue has dried encourage your girls to hang/place their creations somewhere at home!   

Girl Scout Law SWAPS  

While this activity will help your girls learn the Girl Scout Law, it also allows them to participate in another longtime Girl Scout Traditions: SWAPS. The term “SWAPS” is short for: a Special Whatchamacallit Affectionately Pinned Somewhere and is an amazing Girl Scout tradition! Each Girl Scout will make their own SWAPS to exchange with other Girl Scouts promoting friendship and connection.  

Materials:  beads, safety pins, string, and a card with the Girl Scout Law (you can make your own or use this). We recommend using the corresponding bead colors included on this print out.  

Directions: 

  1. Each girl will get a copy of the Girl Scout Law, beads, a key ring and string. The girls should begin placing their beads on the string in the order they appear on the card. As they do this, explain each color and its corresponding line of the Girl Scout Law.  
  1. Once all the beads are in place, tie off the string and attach a safety pin to the top of the chain.  
  1. Afterwards encourage girls to hang onto their Girl Scout Law SWAP or try swapping it with other members in the troop!  

Post by Gabby Dietrich

Investiture Ceremony

What is an Investiture Ceremony? 

An investiture is a traditional ceremony designed to welcome new members to the  

Girl Scout family —both girls and adults alike! An investiture ceremony makes for a great way to start the Girl Scout year. The primary focus is honoring the Girl Scout Promise and Law and it can be customized based upon the age and interests of the group. Since Girl Scouting is always girl-led it is important to let the girls influence the planning of this ceremony.  

The ceremony should have an opening or welcome, the main section which includes the investiture itself and a closing where you’ll leave the group with an inspiring takeaway.  

All investitures should include these 3 key elements: 

  • Recite the Girl Scout Promise, either individually or as a group. 
  • Receive the appropriate membership pin—the Girl Scout Daisy pin, Girl Scout Brownie pin, or Traditional Membership pin, depending on the girls in your troop. 
  • Be verbally welcomed into your troop and to Girl Scouting. You may choose to give the welcome to new members yourself, or returning girls might want to collectively give the welcome. 

What is a Rededication Ceremony?  

Rededication is the opportunity for girls and adults to renew their commitment to the Girl Scout Promise and Law. You can choose to do an investiture and rededication ceremony as one or two separate ceremonies. Just like the investiture ceremony, a rededication can also be easily customized your group. An example of this customization could be scheduling the celebration of this ceremony the week of Juliette Gordon Low’s birthday (October 31st) to highlight the legacy of Girl Scouts.  

Ceremony Example: How to Hold a Candle Light Investiture and Rededication 

Materials Needed:  

  • 1 Small Table 
  • 3 Large Candles (with holders) 
  • 10 Small Candles (with holders) 
  • Matches  
  • Girl Scout Pin for Each Girl/Adult Involved  

Room Set Up:   

  • Candles and matches should be placed on the small table (do not light)  
  • Troop/Group should stand in horseshoe formation  

Holding the Ceremony:  

Start by explaining the importance and meaning of investiture/rededication that we mentioned earlier.  

Then someone will begin to light the 3 large candles which represent the 3 parts of the Girl Scout Promise while reciting:  

  • Candle 1: “The first candle I light shall shine as a symbol that Girl Scouts try to serve God and their country.”  
  • Candle 2: May the light of the second candle shine as a symbol that Girl Scouts try to help people at all times. 
  • Candle 3: “May the light of the third candle shine as a symbol that Girl Scouts are true to their ideals as interpreted by the Girl Scout Law.” 

After that you will move on to the remaining 10 unlit candles, which each represent a part of the Girl Scout Law. As you begin you should assign a portion of the law to each candle so it can be recited when the candle is lit.  

You can now call forward girls/adults from the group to light a candle. If you do not have 10 or more participants you can have girls/adults light multiple candles. Just keep in mind the fire safety guidelines when asking girls/adults to take over the lighting of these candles.   

When ready the girls/adults should begin lighting their candle individually from one of the large candles. As the candle is lit the girl/adult should recite the part of the Girl Scout Law assigned to that candle.  

After the candles have been lit those being invested or rededicated should come forward. You should have the girls/adults (individually or as a group) say the Girl Scout Promise. Then the Troop/Ceremony Leader will pin the Trefoil (Membership Pin) on each girl and say: “This pin tells everyone you are a Girl Scout, I know you will wear it proudly.”  

One option is to pin the pin upside down. If so, the leader says: “I have put your pin on upside down. Do at least 3 good turns or deeds this week, one for each part of the Girl Scout Promise, and at our next meeting I will turn your pin upright.” The pin can also be pinned upright at the ceremony to skip this step if desired.  

Once pinned the leader and girl/adult will do the Girl Scout Handshake. If you want to see how to do the Girl Scout Handshake, check out our video here! The Troop/Ceremony Leader will then welcome the girl/adult to the Girl Scout organization and to the troop.  

After all the members have been invested or rededicated the Troop/Ceremony Leader says:  

“Girl Scouts, the three gold leaves of the trefoil hold a message as you start your journey through Girl Scouting. Today you are entering into an organization that will bring you joy as you work together, play together, seek together. The Trefoil Emblem points the way to sisterhood, friendliness and good citizenship.”  

At the end of the ceremony the group should saying the Girl Scout Promise all together.  

Happy Birthday, Juliette – Happy Birthday, Daisy!

A birthday message from GSHPA President and CEO

Close your eyes and make a wish!

Have you ever blown out the candles on a birthday cake?  Most of us have.  I can remember the single candle on our oldest daughter’s first birthday cupcake, and the cake in full blaze at my grandmother’s last birthday celebration.   I can remember my childhood birthday cakes; my mom always let each of us choose our favorite and she would bake it – even if no one else liked it.  It always came from a box – add 2 eggs, 1/2 cup water, and 2/3 cup oil, but it couldn’t have tasted better.  My childhood birthday cake was always Butter Brickle with Heath Bar.   

When I had my own children, I did the same for them.  For all three, their childhood favorite was chocolate cake with chocolate frosting.   When they were old enough to help bake, they made my birthday cake – and, of course, it was covered from top to bottom with sprinkles.  

After dinner, the candles were placed on the cake, the lights turned out and the match was struck. Then each candle was lit and the singing began.  “Happy Birthday to you.  Happy Birthday to you. . .” And then – the wish.  “Make a wish!  Blow out the candles!”   

I think back to what Juliette Gordon Low, affectionately called Daisy, might have wished for in her childhood. Did she wish to see the day when women might vote?  Did she wish for a movement that would last a century?  I think back to my own childhood birthday wishes.  Honestly I don’t remember any of them, even birthday wishes as an adult.  I am sure there were definitely years when I hoped for a particular present when I blew out the candles, but generally, I remember being caught off guard when my mom said, “Make a wish and blow out the candles.”   How could that be?  Every year, it is the same.  The lights go out, the singing begins, and I have to make a wish, yet, I never felt ready to do so.  

Perhaps, it’s because even as a child, I understood that wishes were just that: wishes.  A dream so light, airy and fun, but not likely to come true without something more.  Even as a child I somehow understood the saying, “If wishes were horses, beggars would ride.”   Somewhere along the line, I learned that wishing isn’t enough.  You need a vision and you need a plan.  I think Juliette Gordon Low came to understand that as well. Her vision to see young girls become resilient and self-reliant women and her plan to do that one girl at a time started in Savannah, Georgia with 18 girls. Juliette Gordon Low’s wish slowly grew into the largest girl’s leadership development program in the world with one of the world’s most recognized and respected brands. 

Juliette Gordon Low’s wish slowly grew into the largest girl’s leadership development program in the world with one of the world’s most recognized and respected brands. 

So how do we further today’s Girl Scout vision of creating girls of courage, confidence, and character who make the world a better place? We still do it with a plan – one girl at a time, one leader at a time.   We each bring new girls to the movement.  We each help every girl to experience all the pillars of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience from life skills to entrepreneurship to the outdoors, to STEAM.  We each participate in projects throughout our own communities as reflected in our highest awards of Bronze, Silver, and Gold Awards.  And all of us live by the Girl Scout Law.  So that is my wish, but that is also my plan.   

On this, what would have been Juliette Gordon Low’s 160th birthday, I wonder what she might wish.   Today, on Juliette’s birthday let’s every one of us close our eyes and make a wish that every girl gets to experience Girl Scouts.  Better yet, let’s close our eyes and make a plan.  I think that’s what Juliette would wish.   

A birthday message from Janet Donovan, GSHPA’s President and CEO

Juliette Gordon Low’s Story

October 31st has many traditions and reasons to celebrate, but this date holds an extra special meaning to Girl Scouts across the world. The founder of Girl Scouts, Juliette Gordon Low, was born on this day, so we celebrate it as “Founder’s Day” throughout the Girl Scout Community.  

In honor of this day, Girl Scouts in the Heart of PA would like to share a story with you – the story of Juliette Gordon Low.  

On a cool autumn night while kids explored the streets in search of treats and tricks on Halloween, Juliette was born on October 31, 1860 in Savannah, Georgia. At birth Juliette was named: Juliette Magil Kinzie Gordon, but was soon given a nickname. Her uncle saw baby Juliette and said she looks like a daisy, and quickly the rest of her family and friends began to call her “Daisy”, which stuck with her as an adult. 

As Juliette got older she had a need for adventure. She faced the world and its challenges head on, and was known for being compassionate and a strong sense of humor.  As a child she was quick to make friends and serve her community. Juliette attended a boarding school for most of her teenage years, but never forgot her roots. Juliette wanted to try her best to make a difference. While home from school Juliette saw a need for children’s’ clothes in her local community, so Juliette brought together a group of her friends and taught them to create clothes for the children in need. That was just one of her many adventures.  

Juliette was also known for being strong throughout life. As you may know Juliette was nearly deaf for most of her life. As a child Juliette developed countless ear infections which were eventually treated with silver nitrate, a new medical treatment, which resulted in Juliette losing almost all of her hearing in that ear. Juliette did not let that stop her, she accepted every challenge along the way. Juliette continued to stay active, excelling in tennis, swimming, horseback riding, and hunting throughout her life.  

In 1882 Juliette decided to travel to Europe for the very first time. While on this trip Juliette met William Mackay Low. William, also known as Willy, was the son of a successful cotton merchant named Andrew Low. Juliette and William would soon form a relationship and wanted to get married. Juliette’s family did not approve of William. Juliette’s father wanted her to marry an independent hardworking man, rather than one from a rich family. Against their families’ wishes Juliette and William were married on December 21, 1886. While exiting the church after the ceremony Juliette and William met with cheers and showered with rice. Unfortunately a grain of rice got stuck in Juliette’s ear and later when it was taken out, her eardrum was damaged, leaving her with more hearing loss.   

After they were married Juliette and William had two homes, one in Savannah, Georgia and the other in England so they could be close to family. Sadly, their marriage was not one of love and devotion, instead William began spending all the family money and found a girlfriend. Juliette left England to return to the United States during the Spanish-American War. Juliette joined her mother at the Florida hospital she was in charge of, giving aid to soldiers injured in battle. After the war Juliette and William’s marriage was close to ending, Juliette was in the process of divorcing William when he died of a stroke in 1905. When William died he left everything to his girlfriend.  

While Juliette experienced countless hardships and loss in her life, but she never gave up. As the years went on Juliette was involved in many activities, but didn’t find her true calling until she met Sir Robert Baden-Powell in 1911. After their meeting Sir Baden-Powell suggested that she work with a local group of girls in England and Scotland. After this experience with Baden-Powell’s organization Juliette quickly decided to bring a similar concept to the United States. When she returned home Juliette contacted her cousin and announced, “I’ve got something for the girls of Savannah, and all of America, and all the world, and we’re going to start tonight!”  

Juliette knew the importance of girls having a place to grow and flourish. On March 12, 1912 Juliette Gordon Low brought together 18 girls from Savannah, Georgia. Juliette broke many of the social conventions of the time when she started Girl Scouts, she wanted to provide all girls regardless of race, socioeconomic status or culture a group where they were welcome. Juliette strived to give all girls a place to develop their leadership skills.  

Over the years Juliette devoted her time, money and resources to expanding the organization. After three years the organization continued to grow, and it was in need of funds. While Juliette had a talent for fundraising she knew that additional sacrifices would need to be made towards the success of Girl Scouting. So in 1915 Juliette Gordon Low sold her dearly loved string of pearls for $8,000, which today would equate to $185,000.  

Through Juliette Gordon Low’s hard work, sacrifice and devotion Girl Scouting quickly grew and expanded. Today, Girl Scouts can be found across the global continuing to offer a safe environment for both girls and adult women to grow and flourish as individuals.  

Juliette Gordon Low died on January 17, 1927 after a long and private battle with breast cancer. After her death she was honored by the establishment of the “Juliette Low World Friendship Fund” which offers Girl Scouts and Girl Guides financial support towards international projects.  

In 1912 Juliette Gordon Low had a vision. It was her hope that one day all girls would have a place to feel comfortable, connected and challenged to develop as leaders and citizens.  

Today, Girl Scouts across the global, including Girl Scouts in the Heart of Pennsylvania, strive to continue her mission of creating girls of courage, confidence and character who make the world a better place.  

Kids Saving the Rainforest

Kids Saving the Rainforest (KSTR) is a non-profit organization founded in 1999 by two nine-year-old girls with the purpose of educating people around the world about the ecological importance of the rainforest.  KSTR has many projects in which they are actively involved in, including a wildlife rehabilitation center!


As part of the wildlife rehabilitation center, we raise baby animals abandoned by their mothers and release them back into the wild. We placed 136 monkey bridges over the roads to prevent harm to wildlife, including the titi monkeys, who have been on the Critically Endangered UN Red List since 1997.  When we started the program in 2000, there were only 1200 titi monkeys left in the world, now there are estimated to be 5700! 

We have a Wildlife Sanctuary for non-releasable animals, this sanctuary has educational tours to teach people of all ages about the rainforest, its destruction, and we then empower them to contribute in saving the rainforest.

We have reforested over 17,400 trees to provide corridors, food, and shelter for the wildlife that we rescue, and have a donated property of 290 acres on which, we plan to naturally regrow 84,000 trees in a period of time.

The KSTR story and efforts to save the rainforest have been featured in many media outlets including Teen Magazine, Teen People, National Geographic Explorer, National Geographic for Kids, National Geographic TV Channel, BBC, Appleseeds, Owl Magazine, Wild Magazine, Nature’s Way, Get Outta Town TV Show, Amazing Kid Of the Month (April 2003, 2004) Young Eco Hero of Action For Nature, and Do Gooder of the Month (April 2004).

Learn more about us at our website. This year, we are excited that GSHPA is partnering with us! Girl Scouts who participate in the Fall Fundraiser Program and who reach the $1200 reward level can Sponsor a Sloth from Kids Saving the Rainforest!

5 Ways to Celebrate JGL’s Birthday

While the world might know October 31st for its Halloween tricks and treats, here at the Girl Scouts this day has an extra special meaning! On October 31st Girl Scouts all over the world honor the memory and celebrate the birthday of our founder, Juliette Gordon Low! October 31st, also referred to as Founders Day, can be celebrated in a variety of ways! Some Girl Scout Troops choose to celebrate throughout the month of October with service projects and special events while others plan a party near her actual birthday.

Troops at all levels are encouraged to recognize and honor Juliette Gordon Low’s (JGL) birthday in some way, whether through a service project or some sort of party. Additionally this can be a great time to work with younger girls on their Girl Scout Way badge!

If you are looking for ideas to honor Juliette Gordon Low in your troop, here are some easy ways to do it!

  1. Learn Girl Scout History! What better time to learn about Girl Scout history than on our founder’s birthday? Learn more about Juliette Gordon Low and how the Girl Scouts got started!
    • Read up on JGL’s story and pick out some interesting facts to turn into a fun game of trivia or bingo! You could also have girls act out different parts of JGL’s story to honor her own love for the arts and acting out plays.
    • Make a JGL inspired paper bag puppet! Have girls design puppets by finding out what kind of Girl Scout uniforms were worn during Juliette Gordon Low’s time. You can get creative and use old scraps of fabric, felt, or construction paper to make these uniforms or you can use markers and crayons to make the craft simpler.
  2. Daisy theme it up! Juliette Gordon Low was nicknamed Daisy, from which the youngest rank of Girl Scouts, the Daisies, gets its name. This makes daisies a perfect fit for decorating a JGL birthday party or planning daisy inspired crafts!
    • Make your own daisies! Have the girls create a bouquet of tissue paper daisies using white and yellow paper. To create the daisies stack 3 white and 1 yellow colored pieces of tissue paper that you have cut into desired size. Accordion pleat the tissue paper working from the long side. Tie a ribbon or wrap one end of a chenille stem around the middle of the accordion pleated paper. Gently separate each layer pulling upwards towards middle of the flower, and WALA you have a beautiful daisy!
  3. Participate in Girl Scout traditions! What better way to celebrate JGL’s birthday then sharing Girl Scout traditions! Remind your girls that they belong to a big, powerful, and inclusive sisterhood rich with history and tradition.
    • Have the girls learn some Girl Scout songs or let the older girls teach younger girls their favorites!
    • SWAPS or “Special Whatchamacallits Affectionately Pinned Somewhere” are a great way to build friendship while getting creative and participating in a long time Girl Scout tradition! Some of troops take this time to make SWAPS inspired by Juliette’s pearls, which are well known because Juliette sold them to pay the rent for the National Office stating that “Jewels are not important, but my Girl Scouts are, they need money more than I need pearls”.
  4. Play JLG inspired Games! Honoring Juliette Gordon Low is a great opportunity to have some fun and play games that were popular for girls when she was alive. Some favorites include relay races, scavenger hunts, and head stands.
    • Have a scavenger hunt! Show the girls a tray with many items on it, and explain that each of those items is also hidden somewhere in the room or location that the party is being held. Send the girls out to find as many of the objects as they can. This can also be adjusted for virtual celebrations by putting objects on a tray and sharing the image on your screen for 30 seconds, then when you stop sharing give the girls a minute to record as many objects they can remember. 
    • Conduct a headstand challenge by seeing which Girl Scout can stand on her head the longest! One of JGL’s special skills was standing on her head. She was known for standing on her head on her birthday every year to prove that she still could. Once Juliette even stood on her head in the board room at National Headquarters to show off the new Girl Scout shoes!
  5. Community Service: JLG’s birthday is a great opportunity for Girl Scouts to work our mission by making the world a better place! Discuss how the girls can live out the Girl Scout slogan that has been around since 1912, “Do a good turn daily”. Talk to the girls about who they think needs help in their community and brainstorm ways to get involved.
    • JGL died at the age of 67 due to breast cancer. Since her birthday and Breast Cancer Awareness month are in October, this could be a great time to do some good for the National Breast Cancer Research Foundation. Your troop could collect small gifts that can be given to those who are fighting breast cancer.
    • Bring your community into the celebration by having the girls create Birthday-in-a-Bag’s! This fun service project started with Girl Scouts in Kansas and has quickly gotten popular with troops nationwide. Have your troop collect birthday party decorations to fill gift bags and delivered to your local food bank.

Mostly, take this opportunity to connect and celebrate the amazing contribution that Juliette Gordon Low has made to our world and forever Girl Scout hearts. Let us know how your troop celebrated this special time!