Camp Spotlight

Here at GSHPA, we are looking forward to warmer days with friends in the great outdoors! Getting outdoors is an important part of Girl Scouting, which is why GSHPA offers a variety of camp options, including Summer Camp, troop camping, Day Camps, family camping, and campground property rentals! Some of the most amazing Girl Scout memories are made at GSHPA’s campgrounds.  

In order to prepare ourselves for another season of camping we wanted to hear from one of our very own Girl Scouts! We asked Emily, a first year Cadette from Bear Creep Troop 32109, to share about her favorite Girl Scout camping experiences.  

Read below for what Emily had to say about Girl Scout camping! 

What is a favorite Girl Scout camping memory?  

Emily: “When my friends and I went down the slip and slide, and the water slide. We also had a water fight with balloons and water guns, we even used buckets and filled them with water and ice. It was so much fun!” 

What is something that you have learned while camping with Girl Scouts? 

Emily: “I learned how to make friends. I kept in touch with my friend that I made at camp who was alone at camp and I went and introduced myself and we became friends.” 

Do you have a favorite Girl Scout camp and why?  

Emily: “I have been to Camp Archbald and Camp Small Valley. I like Camp Small Valley the best. I enjoy swimming in the pool versus swimming in a lake.” 

What is a new experience you had camping with Girl Scouts?  

Emily: “I had many new experiences at camp. I have camped during the worst of storms and although it can be scary we still had fun during the down pouring rain. I also went horseback riding and it was so fun we got to walk with them and ride them. Also just being away from home is a new experience that I have learned to adjust to, but I’m not going lie, I do get a bit homesick sometimes.” 

What is something you would tell a new Girl Scout going camping for her first time? 

Emily: “I would say just to make as many friends as you can. Making friends is making memories.” 

To find out how you can make your own memories at a GSHPA camp check out our website. Do you have GSHPA camp memories to share? Tell us about them in the comments below or contact us about being featured in a blog post!  

Girl Scout Mom

I was recently asked to share a favorite memory from Girl Scouts. With the question, I was flooded with my experiences from Girl Scouts and immediately knew my answer was creating memories with my daughters. Although I was not a Girl Scout growing up, I have been a member for the last five years and have already made many amazing memories.  

Me and Izzy at our first Girl Scout camping trip!

Over the last 5 years, the Girl Scouts has helped my daughter and I bond while experiencing new things together. My favorite memories come from camping with my daughter’s troop. We have taken camping trips to Camp Happy Valley and Camp Small Valley. First, these trips were with my oldest daughter, Izzy, and then my youngest, Marley, when she was old enough. Due to my lack of experience going to camp, I was blown away at how awesome camping with the Girl Scouts was! We cooked over a fire, crafted, tie-dyed, hiked, shared stories, sang, and laughed A LOT. Watching my daughters build friendships and experience the outdoors are memories I will cherish forever.  

The girls at camp!

Another favorite memory that comes to mind when thinking about the Girl Scouts is working with my daughters at the fair. Each year, the local Girl Scout troops take turns running the infamous Girl Scout milkshake stand at the Shippensburg Fair. As explained earlier, having never been part of teams or groups I had no idea what we were signing up for! The first year Izzy and I worked the Girl Scout milkshake stand from 5-11pm with nonstop customers. I was in awe watching how well my daughter worked under pressure! The girls take pride in the milkshake stand knowing they are earning money for their troop. Over the years, we have taken many shifts and made a lot of milkshakes, and I couldn’t be prouder. 

Izzy waiting on customers at the Shippensburg Fair.

The last memory I will share is the countless cookie booths. Although at times, a cookie booth shift seemed like another thing I had to fit into my already busy schedule, they were opportunities to make memories with my daughters. During cookie booth shifts I got to watch Izzy and Marley gain skills by dealing with customers, pitching their ideas, and building friendships and trust with their troops. Treating ourselves to a box of tasty cookies at the end of a shift always left a sweet spot for the overall experience!  

Marley getting ready for cookie booth!!

Do you have Girl Scout memories to share? Let us know


Post by Gabby Dietrich

SWAPS

Girl Scouts is an organization with a rich history of traditions. One of my personal favorites is the tradition of exchanging, “Special Whatchamacallits Affectionately Pinned Somewhere,” also lovingly known as SWAPS. These “Special Whatchamacallits” have been a part of our Girl Scout history since they first appeared in the 1950s and 60s at national Senior Roundup events. These items are small in nature but serve as the perfect reminders of Girl Scout memories and friends. Typically, SWAPS are small enough to pin to a hat or backpack, and have a tag that shares contact information for the troop or girl that is exchanging the SWAPS.  

In my experience as a young Girl Scout, I most often saw SWAPS exchanges while at summer camp or large events. Nowadays there are ways to send SWAPS nationwide, similar to a pen pal connection. Back in September of 2020, one of our GSHPA volunteers told me of how her troop had spent all summer exchanging SWAPS with troops not only nationwide, but worldwide! After hearing that, she and I agreed that a SWAPS exchange within GSHPA would be a fun way for girls to connect safely during the pandemic, and thus the GSHPA SWAPS Exchange event was born!  

We had 9 Juliettes and 66 troops participate in our first GSHPA SWAPS exchange. Now not only did participants get to connect with troops across our council footprint, they also got to show their creativity in more ways than one! Our girls thought of some very creative SWAPS ideas to fit our winter theme, but they also used their creativity to find a way to make these SWAPS during the pandemic, at a time that in person troop meetings were not allowed. Again and again throughout the pandemic I have been amazed at how well our girls handle the ever-constant change, and adapt to our new virtual way of life. With Zoom meetings happening for school and other extracurricular activities like Girl Scouts, it is so great to see the girls’ creativity continue to shine through! I don’t know about you, but it makes me super proud to be a Girl Scout! 


Post by Colleen Sypien, Volunteer Support Coordinator

5 Patches to Earn this Winter

Filling a vest or sash with colorful patches and badges is a wonderful way for Girl Scouts to remember all the adventures and skills they are experiencing.  Both badges and patches and an important part of the Girl Scout experience, many people use the words interchangeably without understanding the important difference between the two.  

What is the difference? I’m glad you asked! 

Badges 

Juliette Gordon Low, founder of the Girl Scouts said it best, 

“Every badge you earn is tied up to your motto. This badge is not a reward for something you have done once or for an examination you have passed.  Badges are not medals to wear on your sleeve to show what a smart girl you are.  A badge is a symbol that you have done the thing that stands for often enough, thoroughly enough, and well enough to be prepared to give service in it.  You wear the badge to let people know that you are prepared and will to be called on because you are a Girl Scout.  And Girl Scouting is not just knowing, but doing.  Not just doing, but being.”

Juliette Gordon Low

Badges are to help girls explore their interest and learn new skills.  They require specific steps and are displayed on the front of their uniforms.  

The steps for each badge are listed in the badge descriptions that are published in the Girl’s Guide to Girl Scouting.  Girls must complete each step to earn the badge.   

Here is a complete listing of badges for every age level.  

Patches 

Patches are similar to badges in look, but are considered “unofficial” and are worn on the back of the girls sash or vest.  Patches are handy if the girls want to do a fun activity or try something new that isn’t badge related.  

Girls can get a fun patch for any activity they participate in through Girl Scouts.  It could be a hike, museum visit, STEAM program, or a virtual event, she has no limit to the number of patches she can display on her back.  

Fun patches are the best! They give the girls the freedom to get creative and mix in activities for service, for celebrations, and for team building/bonding, or just for fun! Recently we met Vanessa, a Daisy in Troop 10581 Vanessa and her grandmother did virtual Girl Scout activities all summer, and collected so many patches her grandmother added a panel on the back of her vest!  

Vanessa showing off her patches!

Girl Scouts love to collect the patches and their vests/sashes become a scrapbook of all their adventures and accomplishments.  Here are a few more patches to add to your girls’ collections this winter and some trivia to test your badge/patch knowledge.  

Virtual Hangout Patch  

Anti-Racism Patch 

Baking at Home Patch  

Future STEM-inist Patch  

Draw The Lines PA

Clean Water Grows on Trees

Suffrage Centennial Patch

Trivia Corner 

Baking is a science and Girl scouts have plenty of STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) badges to explore.  How many STEM badges does Girl Scouts offer? 

  1. 47 
  2. 20 
  3. 78 

In the 1980’s the most popular Junior Badge was: 

  1. Housekeeping 
  2. First Aid 
  3. Math Whiz 
  4. Art in the Round 

Which is NOT one of the four main categories badges are split into 

  1. STEM 
  2. Outdoors 
  3. Life Skills 
  4. Teaching 

What is one thing you can do to earn a gardening fun patch? 

  1. Research how to care for different plants.  
  2. Talk to a master gardener. 
  3. Plant your own garden.  
  4. All of the above.  

What is one thing I can do to earn a SWAPS fun patch? Let us know your answers in the comments! 


Post by Liz Bleacher

How to Respond to Hard Conversations

Growing up is hard, but growing up during a global pandemic, political unrest, climate change, and a 24-hour news cycle is unprecedented! As an adult I can often feel overwhelmed by it all, so I can only imagine what our young people might be feeling. With all that is happening around us, along with the regular challenges of life, young people are bound to have questions!  

As troop leaders, volunteers, parents, and caregivers we have an important role in the lives of our Girl Scouts. Given all our girls are facing it is inevitable for tough conversation topics to come up. In order to build girls of courage, confidence and character we need to provide them with safe spaces to process what is happening around them.  

It can be frightening when a tough subject comes up, but keep in mind that some of the hardest things to talk about are often the most important! So here are 5 tips to help you prepare to tackle tough topics and conversations: 

  1. Keep the conversation GIRL LED.  

In Girl Scouts, we know that girls are most interested and passionate about the topics THEY pick, including tough or sensitive topics. While it might be tempting to quickly change the subject when a tough topic comes up, avoiding hard things doesn’t help anyone. If a Girl Scout brings up a hard topic it is a sign, she trusts you or feels safe and hushing the topic could result in feelings of shame and confusion.  

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Instead of changing the subject, if able, give her your full attention. If the topic was brought up at a challenging time, acknowledge that and make a plan for the discussion at a time when you can give your full attention. Do not make assumptions about the girl’s feelings or understanding on a topic, have them share what they know in their own words. Practice active listening and validate what they are sharing. If a girl has disclosed a sensitive personal story, do not ask detail-oriented questions but instead reflect or repeat back what she is saying and feeling to make sure you understand. Using statements like “it sounds like you are feeling” or “I hear you saying” can be helpful in clarifying and validating feelings and statements.  

  1. Keep conversation judgment free and strength based.  

Talking about sensitive or tough topics can be a vulnerable experience so it is important create a safe space. If planning ahead for a tough topic, have the girls establish ground rules for the conversation or space (no judgement, name-calling, interrupting, etc.). When the girls are sharing and expressing their thoughts avoid sharing your judgements or speculations. If something hard is shared, remain calm and don’t add to the stress with your reaction. An intense reaction can make something feel scarier and harder, try to meet the girl where she’s at emotionally.  

Practice and role model empathy, the ability to understand and share the feelings. While practicing empathy we are not trying to fix, rescue, or solve a problem, we are instead providing support by connecting through shared feelings. Empathy helps us consider the other person’s point of view. If there are disagreements between your girls, ask them to consider what the other person is feeling. When discussing tough news stories, talk about what those impacted may be feeling. One of the ultimate benefits of empathy is the ability to consider the other person’s perspective when solving conflicts or figuring out compromise. 

While affirming hard feelings or concerns, it is also important to help girls find hope and see their strengths. Recognize how brave it is to share feelings and talk about difficult topics. Empower by acknowledging their strength and ability to make positive change. Tough conversations can be a time to discuss what courage, confidence, and character mean to them in relation to what is going on in their community and world.  

  1. Breathe.  You don’t have to be the expert! 

As the adult you may feel pressure to know the answers or have solutions. Try not to be distracted by this pressure or trying to say exactly the “right” thing. Many times, just having a supportive listening ear can be what’s needed most. 

When discussing a hard topic only share what you know is true. If you aren’t sure, be honest and suggest you find the answers together. Make space for sharing knowledge and experiences but never single out a girl to answer a question or speak for her racial, ethnic, or religious group. Empower the girls to find their own answers with developmentally appropriate resources on related topics. Books on the topics of race, diversity, discrimination, grief, and important related issues can be helpful resources. 

  1. Safety is always first! 

When working with or around young people, safety is always a consideration. As adults it is our responsibility to keep the young people around us safe. If a girl discloses any form of abuse it needs to be reported to child protective services. As the adult who she disclosed to it is not your job to investigate, or find out more information, but simply provide support and report to child protective services. You do not have to be sure or have proof of abuse, if there is any suspicion it is better to be safe and report. It can feel scary to make a report but it may result in the girl and family connecting to services they need. If you are unsure if a report should be made you can call the Childline hotline and discuss concerns.  

The toll-free hotline, 1-800-932-0313, is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week to receive reports of suspected child abuse. Mandated reporters can report electronically.  

  1. That was tough. Take care of yourself! 

Tough conversations can be mentally and emotionally exhausting. Remember to take some time to practice good self-care! If able, at the end of the conversation take time to debrief and process feelings that may have come up. Make a self-care plan for the remainder of the day. Respect the privacy of information disclosed but if you are feeling heavy after the conversation reach out for support. Taking deep breaths, a walk, or time for creative processing can all be helpful ways to release some feelings and care for yourself.  

Check out additional resources for common tough topics: 

If your a GSHPA volunteer and interested in learning more about responding to hard conversations, check out our upcoming Volunteer Conference where I will be talking more on the subject!


Post by Gabby Dietrich

News: GSHPA Volunteer Conference

GSHPA is getting excited about our upcoming virtual volunteer conference happening February 20th from 9am-12pm. The conference will feature inspiring speakers, breakout sessions with opportunities to expand personal development and Girl Scout expertise, as well as networking opportunities! 

Breakout sessions will explore how to plan a Journey in a day/weekend, outdoor programming, how to run a virtual meeting, how to keep girls engaged virtually, being a part of challenging conversations, as well as Girl Scout Traditions and Ceremonies.  

You can register through www.gshpa.org or hereMake sure to register by January 30th! An email with the breakout session registration will be sent to all participants at a later date. Each participant will receive a goodie bag in the mail with conference materials, resources and access to the recorded sessions. 

News: Girl Scouts collaborate with GrubHub for cookie delivery during COVID-19 pandemic

Girl Scouts knows it’s a challenging time for usual cookie selling techniques so we are getting creative! This year the Girl Scouts have announced a new collaboration with Grubhub. And, online ordering will be available nationwide beginning on Feb. 1 for people who don’t know a Girl Scout to order cookies and have them delivered directly to their home. Read more about the collaboration here.

Cookie Season is Upon Us!

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Now, more than ever, the comfort and familiarity of biting into a delicious Girl Scout Cookie is needed. Our Girl Scouts are ready to build their business, reach their goals, and meet the cookie demand! 

Girl Scouts in the Heart of Pennsylvania will begin selling cookies on January 15th. Girls will have their order cards until February 12th to take orders AND will be creating their cookie website so customers can order online. Customers can even order online and skip the shipping fee by choosing in-person girl delivery until February 12th. (Those cookies will arrive in March) 

Cookies will arrive in mid-March. Girls will fulfill their orders and then can go out into the world, safely of course, to continue reaching their goals! Contactless payment and delivery is an option all season long!  

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The cookie season ends on April 11th. Customers should make sure to stock up! Girl Scout Cookies are great in various recipes (find some hereand they freeze well! 

Here is GSHPA’s Cookie Line Up for 2021:  

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Ready to buy some cookies?! Beginning Friday, January 15th, you can go to our website and found out where to get cookies in your area!


Post by Jess Delp

STEAM Snack: Cookie Creations!

Hello! Welcome back to our monthly post that will focus on STEAM activities and snacks you can do at home with your family or with your troops! 

January can seem like a time when there’s not much going on – the holidays have passed, decorations are being put away, and it feels like it gets colder each day. January is also the perfect time to incorporate fun and creative STEAM projects for your family and Girl Scouts to overcome those “January doldrums.” This food science activity combines BOTH the STEAM and a snack! There are so many more STEAM projects out there and if you have a favorite or a new topic you’d like to see please let us know in the comments. 

Why food science? 

Food science is simply the study of food! Food Scientists use various scientific and engineering methods to explore the food we eat every day. They take a closer look at the physical (what we can see), microbial (what we can’t see), and chemical makeup (how different ingredients interact) of food. Food Scientists apply their findings to develop safe, nutritious, and sustainable foods. They also create innovative packaging that are used in stores and supermarkets. A Food Scientist’s job contributes to ensuring that our food supply is: 

  • Safe 
  • Nutritious 
  • Tastes good 
  • Economical 
  • Abundant 
  • Easy to prepare 
  • Sustainable  

Food Scientists use creative thinking to solve problems and come up with brand new food products and packaging. So this is a great opportunity to enable girls to think outside-of-the-box and expand their creativity to help make the world a better place. A great way to guide your girls’ thinking is through the stages of creative thinking: 

  1. Preparation: The very first step of the creativity process; it refers to the curiosity of an individual to explore a problem. At this stage, you identify the problem and collect all the information you need in order to properly formulate it and start thinking about possible solutions. This is when you have to set your goals, conduct research, map your thoughts and brainstorm. 
  2. Incubation: During this stage, you might stop thinking directly about your problem as you begin to combine your thoughts putting your imagination in action. You don’t have to find a solution now, but this is the beginning of its construction. 
  3. Illumination: This is when your ideas come together becoming one piece in a logical manner. It is what is known as the “aha” or “eureka” experience. 
  4. Evaluation: At this stage, you need to evaluate the solution that came as an epiphany into your mind. Ask for feedback and make any adjustments needed in order for your solution to be valid and finally approved. 
  5. Implementation: The final step of the creative thinking process is to transform your solution into a final product. Implement your ideas and make changes until you are pleased with the result. 

(Source: https://engage.erasmus.site/creativity/5/)  

What if I’m not an expert? 

We are not all food scientists, and it’s okay to feel like we don’t know enough to lead the girls in a food experiment. But remember you do! Think back to the time when you were young and were told not to play with your food – for food scientists, using food for something other than a meal or snack is actually their job – so embrace what comes along with this activity and refer back to the 5 stages of creative thinking.  

If you are feeling you want more expert knowledge reach out to your troop parents, friends, relatives or other GSHPA troop leaders on the GSHPA Facebook page to see if there is a food scientist or someone who works in the food industry that you can invite to come talk to your girls.   

How do I get started? 

Take some time to look over the 5 stages of creative thinking. These stages are not only helpful for this activity, but can be applied to almost all activities and situations in life and Girl Scouting.  

Take a look at the following links to read about cooking experiments and the different branches of food science. If your girls are interested in learning more about food science, have them do research on different colleges, universities, and companies that offer or utilize food scientists.  

The Badges 

Our activity is a great start to partially completing Step 2: Discover the Possibilities in the Brownie, Junior, and Cadette STEM Career Exploration Badges. This badge explores 6 different fields of STEM careers and food science is listed under the Food & Agriculture field: 

  • Computer science 
  • Creative technology & design 
  • Engineering 
  • Food & agriculture – a field that focuses on growing, cooking, and consuming food. It includes careers such as a baker, farmer, food scientist, chef, agricultural engineer, urban farmer, and agricultural scientist. 
  • Health & wellness 
  • Nature & environment  

The Activity 

Materialsat least 2-3 kinds of cookies (use your favorites, granola bars work great too), frosting (as many flavors as you like, or you can use Nutella, jams, etc.), sprinkles, plates, cups, spoons, butter knives, paper towels/towels, multiple pieces of paper, pencil, things to color with. *(Cookies and frosting can be swapped out for healthier choices, use whatever snack foods you like!) 

Set up a separate table or section of table where you are working with all the food supplies: cookies, frostings, sprinkles, etc. This is where girls will go when they need more supplies. Use plates for the cookies and small cups or bowls for the frosting and sprinkles. 

For this activity, the girls will act as food scientists to come up with a brand new cookie! Girls will use existing cookies and materials to create several cookie samples, document their cookie creation steps, design cookie packaging, and then share their ideas. Throughout this activity, break the steps into each of the 5 steps of creative thinking. Remember – creativity is a process that results in generating new ideas OR transforming old ideas into new ones. You will help the girls create new cookies OR transform ones into a brand new idea. 

Introduction to the GirlsStart the activity by talking to the girls about what a food scientist is and introduce the 5 stages of creative thinking process. Refer to the list of questions & talking points: 

  • Have you ever heard of food science/food scientists? 
  • Raise your hand if you like to cook or bake – some of you are closer to food science than you think! 
  • Have you ever wondered how different foods or snacks at the grocery store are created? They are designed and developed by food scientists! They think of new and innovative ways to create food for us to eat every day. 
  • Ask about favorite snack foods and things they’ve seen at the grocery store. 

Step 1: Preparation 

  • Explain to the girls that they are acting as food scientists that have been tasked with creating a new cookie. They’ve been given certain samples and need to create a new combination.  
  • Pass out paper and pencil. Have the girls fold their paper so it creates three different sections. This is where they will write down their notes for the three different kinds of cookies they will create. Girls should include the following info for each cookie: 
  • Name, ingredients/samples used, and a brief description of what the cookie is like/tastes like. 

Step 2: Incubation 

  • This is where girls are able to gather supplies to create their THREE cookie samples. 
  • Encourage them to try and make three different types of cookies if possible. 
  • Let girls’ creativity and imagination run wild in this step. Remind them that we are scientists, so we must write down our ideas and steps we take in designing each cookie so we can refer back to them later.  

Step 3: Illumination 

  • During this time, girls should have all three cookies made.  
  • Once they have their three samples, they will choose ONE cookie to move forward with. 
  • This step is important, as food scientists create many different samples but only ONE ends up getting chosen.  
  • Have them review the notes they took about each cookie.  
  • Who would like this cookie/who is the best consumer? 
  • Is this cookie easy to eat or really messy? 
  • Remind younger girls that even though they have to pick just one cookie, the time they took to create all three is so important! Without creating and testing their cookies, they wouldn’t know which would be the better of the three they created.  

Step 4: Evaluation 

  • Have the girls share their cookie ideas with each other and get feedback. 
  • Feedback is great because it can help the girls improve their cookie designs and make them even better.  

Step 5: Implementation 

  • The final step is to transform their solution into a final product – implement the changes they received from the feedback. 
  • Once their cookie creation is complete, girls will complete the last step – use their imagination to create what their cookie packaging will look like!  
  • Girls will use paper, pencil, and things to color with. 
  • To help them think of ideas, grab any boxes or packages of food in your kitchen and have the girls take a look: 
  • Colors, shape, size, where the name of the cookie is, etc.  
  • If you have extra boxes, tape the girls’ pictures onto a box to bring it to life! 
  • When they are ready to begin, have them draw what their cookie box/packaging looks like. 
  • For older girls, take it one step further and ask about packaging materials (plastic, paper, etc.), are the materials sustainable or environmentally friendly, how many cookies are in each package, etc.  

Present their products 

Make sure to leave 10-15 minutes, depending on how talkative your group is, to review with them. 

Once the girls have finished creating their packaging, have each of them share their cookies! Have them share as much information about their new creation as they want. To help guide you, ask girls these questions: 

  • What is the name of your cookie? 
  • How did you decide on the flavor? 
  • How did you decide on your cookie packaging/box? 
  • What’s your favorite thing about your cookie? 
  • Who do you think would buy your cookie if it was sold in stores?  
  • Has this activity inspired you to learn more about food? 

Congratulations, you did it! You deserve a snack – eat your cookie creations! Remember those cookies that didn’t get chosen? Time to snack on those! If you have extra cookie creation supplies, design another snack to enjoy!  


Post by Colleen Park, Program Coordinator

GSHPA 2021 Book Recommendations

Happy New Year! 

Do you have a resolution? Looking for one? Either way, reading more is always a good idea! We asked our friend and author, Laurie Morrison for a list of book recommendations. Perhaps you remember Laurie from the Author Career Chat! 

BOOK CLUB PATCH | Girl scout patches, Girl scout badges, Girl scout fun  patches

Whether you’re looking to laugh, cry, escape, or feel empowered, this list has something for every reader in 5th-8th grade! 

  • Eva Evergreen, Semi-Magical Witch by Julie Abe 
  • The Only Black Girls in Town by Brandy Colbert 
  • A Place at the Table by Saadia Faruqi and Laura Shovan 
  • Every Shiny Thing by Cordelia Jensen and Laurie Morrison 
  • Dress Coded by Carrie Firestone 
  • Stand Up, Yumi Chung! by Jessica Kim 
  • Measuring Up by Lily LaMotte and Ann Xu 
  • From the Desk of Zoe Washington by Janae Marks 
  • Up for Air by Laurie Morrison 
  • Ana on the Edge by A.J. Sass 
  • Other Words for Home by Jasmine Warga 

For younger readers, try these! 

  • The Derby Daredevils Series (Kenzie Kickstarts a Team and Shelly Struggles to Shine) by Kit Rosewater, illustrated by Sophie Escabasse 
  • The Jasmine Toguchi books by Debbi Michiko Florence, illustrated by Elizabet Vucovik 
  • The Vanderbeekers books by Karina Yan Glaser 
  • The Yasmin books by Saadia Faruqi, illustrated by Hatem Aly 

High school readers might enjoy these! 

  • Raybearer by Jordan Ifueko 
  • The Way the Light Bends by Cordelia Jensen 
  • You Should See Me in a Crown by Leah Johnson 
  • Unscripted by Nicole Kronzer 

Check out some of these titles and let us know what you think after you’ve read them!  


Post by Jess Delp