Honoring Josephine Holloway

Josephine Holloway, is a champion of diversity and was one of the first Black Girl Scout troop leaders in the United States.  

Josephine wanted to bring the Girl Scout programming to girls at a local women’s shelter in Nashville, Tennessee, in 1924 she fought for that opportunity. By the end of the year more than 300 girls were participating in Girl Scout-inspired activities.  

Almost 10 years later in 1933, when Blacks and other minorities in our country still faced racism and segregation, Josephine first attempted to form an official troop for Black girls. Her request was denied, the local council cited the high cost of maintaining separate facilities for Blacks.   

Josephine fought on, and in 1942, after showing much perseverance, the region’s first Black Girl Scout troop was formed.  During a time that segregations and oppression was still commonplace.  

Learn more about Josephine Holloway and her vision, courage, and passion for bringing Girl Scouting to all girls here

You can also celebrate Josephine and Black History Month by completing the Josephine Holloway SWAPS from Girl Scouts of Colorado.  

We want to hear what you are doing to use your Girl Scout skills by taking initiative, serving your community and Girl Scouting at home. Share you story here.  


Post by Liz Bleacher

National Brownie Day

Did you know December 8th is National Brownie Day? Well, now you know! Every year, the delicious desserts we recognize as brownies are celebrated on December 8th. As Girl Scouts, we know this tasty dessert is not the only “brownie” that deserves to be celebrated! Brownies, the second program level in Girl Scouts, is open to girls in grades 2-3. So why not take National Brownie Day to celebrate both the scrumptious and the scouting?   

Check out these 5 easy ways to celebrate National Brownie Day with your favorite Brownies this year!  

  1. Bake and eat brownies with a Girl Scout twist! Enjoy some warm, chocolatey brownies with your favorite Girl Scout cookie added to the mix!  
  1. Explore the history behind brownies! Have you ever wondered how brownies came to be? National Brownie Day is the perfect day to explore the history of each one! We recommend starting with the chocolatey dessert! You can take this time to research who invented them and how they became such a classic dessert! Can you guess the 5 ingredients that make up the classic brownie recipe?  

Additionally, you can have fun learning about how Girl Scouts became known as “Brownies”. Did you know that Girl Scout Brownies were originally called “Rosebuds,” but the name was later changed? The term “Brownies” was suggested by Lord Robert Baden-Powell, a close friend of Juliette Gordon Low. The term was originally used in folktales to describe small individuals who were both helpful and magical, also known as fairies! Various versions of these classic stories have been included in the Brownie handbooks over the years, and they are the basis for the traditional Brownie investiture ceremony. Check out the Brownie Story here.   

  1. Learn a Girl Scout brownie song and make a new one! As Girl Scouts, we love to get together with our friends and sing. Learn the “Brownie Smile” song below and then try creating your very own song! Maybe you can even include lyrics about your favorite brownie desserts! 
  1. Make brownie inspired SWAPS! SWAPS stands for “Special Whatchamacallits Affectionately Pinned Somewhere”. Traditionally, these are made by Girl Scouts to exchange with others as tokens of friendship! So to celebrate National Brownie Day try making brownie inspired SWAPS. If you would like to recreate the one pictured you will just need a sponge, construction paper, brown paint, writing tool, and glue!  
  1. Recognize a special brownie in your life! It’s National Brownie Day? What better day to thank a Girl Scout Brownie with a nice treat! Make a card or write a letter for a helper making your life sweeter!  

Post by Gabby Dietrich

Juliette Gordon Low’s Story

October 31st has many traditions and reasons to celebrate, but this date holds an extra special meaning to Girl Scouts across the world. The founder of Girl Scouts, Juliette Gordon Low, was born on this day, so we celebrate it as “Founder’s Day” throughout the Girl Scout Community.  

In honor of this day, Girl Scouts in the Heart of PA would like to share a story with you – the story of Juliette Gordon Low.  

On a cool autumn night while kids explored the streets in search of treats and tricks on Halloween, Juliette was born on October 31, 1860 in Savannah, Georgia. At birth Juliette was named: Juliette Magil Kinzie Gordon, but was soon given a nickname. Her uncle saw baby Juliette and said she looks like a daisy, and quickly the rest of her family and friends began to call her “Daisy”, which stuck with her as an adult. 

As Juliette got older she had a need for adventure. She faced the world and its challenges head on, and was known for being compassionate and a strong sense of humor.  As a child she was quick to make friends and serve her community. Juliette attended a boarding school for most of her teenage years, but never forgot her roots. Juliette wanted to try her best to make a difference. While home from school Juliette saw a need for children’s’ clothes in her local community, so Juliette brought together a group of her friends and taught them to create clothes for the children in need. That was just one of her many adventures.  

Juliette was also known for being strong throughout life. As you may know Juliette was nearly deaf for most of her life. As a child Juliette developed countless ear infections which were eventually treated with silver nitrate, a new medical treatment, which resulted in Juliette losing almost all of her hearing in that ear. Juliette did not let that stop her, she accepted every challenge along the way. Juliette continued to stay active, excelling in tennis, swimming, horseback riding, and hunting throughout her life.  

In 1882 Juliette decided to travel to Europe for the very first time. While on this trip Juliette met William Mackay Low. William, also known as Willy, was the son of a successful cotton merchant named Andrew Low. Juliette and William would soon form a relationship and wanted to get married. Juliette’s family did not approve of William. Juliette’s father wanted her to marry an independent hardworking man, rather than one from a rich family. Against their families’ wishes Juliette and William were married on December 21, 1886. While exiting the church after the ceremony Juliette and William met with cheers and showered with rice. Unfortunately a grain of rice got stuck in Juliette’s ear and later when it was taken out, her eardrum was damaged, leaving her with more hearing loss.   

After they were married Juliette and William had two homes, one in Savannah, Georgia and the other in England so they could be close to family. Sadly, their marriage was not one of love and devotion, instead William began spending all the family money and found a girlfriend. Juliette left England to return to the United States during the Spanish-American War. Juliette joined her mother at the Florida hospital she was in charge of, giving aid to soldiers injured in battle. After the war Juliette and William’s marriage was close to ending, Juliette was in the process of divorcing William when he died of a stroke in 1905. When William died he left everything to his girlfriend.  

While Juliette experienced countless hardships and loss in her life, but she never gave up. As the years went on Juliette was involved in many activities, but didn’t find her true calling until she met Sir Robert Baden-Powell in 1911. After their meeting Sir Baden-Powell suggested that she work with a local group of girls in England and Scotland. After this experience with Baden-Powell’s organization Juliette quickly decided to bring a similar concept to the United States. When she returned home Juliette contacted her cousin and announced, “I’ve got something for the girls of Savannah, and all of America, and all the world, and we’re going to start tonight!”  

Juliette knew the importance of girls having a place to grow and flourish. On March 12, 1912 Juliette Gordon Low brought together 18 girls from Savannah, Georgia. Juliette broke many of the social conventions of the time when she started Girl Scouts, she wanted to provide all girls regardless of race, socioeconomic status or culture a group where they were welcome. Juliette strived to give all girls a place to develop their leadership skills.  

Over the years Juliette devoted her time, money and resources to expanding the organization. After three years the organization continued to grow, and it was in need of funds. While Juliette had a talent for fundraising she knew that additional sacrifices would need to be made towards the success of Girl Scouting. So in 1915 Juliette Gordon Low sold her dearly loved string of pearls for $8,000, which today would equate to $185,000.  

Through Juliette Gordon Low’s hard work, sacrifice and devotion Girl Scouting quickly grew and expanded. Today, Girl Scouts can be found across the global continuing to offer a safe environment for both girls and adult women to grow and flourish as individuals.  

Juliette Gordon Low died on January 17, 1927 after a long and private battle with breast cancer. After her death she was honored by the establishment of the “Juliette Low World Friendship Fund” which offers Girl Scouts and Girl Guides financial support towards international projects.  

In 1912 Juliette Gordon Low had a vision. It was her hope that one day all girls would have a place to feel comfortable, connected and challenged to develop as leaders and citizens.  

Today, Girl Scouts across the global, including Girl Scouts in the Heart of Pennsylvania, strive to continue her mission of creating girls of courage, confidence and character who make the world a better place.