Women in STEAM: Dr. Joe Hill-Kittle, NASA

By Liz Bleacher

Today we are talking with Dr. Joanne (Joe) Hill-Kittle, Deputy Director Engineering and Technology Directorate at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Dr. Joe and I have been communicating back and forth for a while now for GSHPA events, she has joined us to talk engineering and space a few times and we thought it would be fun to get a little more in-depth about what inspired her to get into STEM.

GSHPA: First and most important questions, when did you first become interested in STEM? Bonus points if you were in Girl Scouts. Was there a moment where you knew you were going to go into STEM?

Dr. Joe: I have a clear memory of sitting on the gate to the farmers field across from my house with my best friend at the age of 7 stating I wanted to be the first woman on the moon. I remember being worried that by the time I was old enough lots of people would be at the moon. Now I hope to play a part (however small) of putting the first women and first person of colour on the moon. I knew this dream would mean I would have to study hard in STEM. I was a Brownie and a Girl Guide (kind of a UK equivalents to Girl Scouts) for many years and learnt a lot about leadership and perseverance which helped me on my path.

GSHPA: With your early start with STEM and dreams of the moon, what is your favorite memory of STEM at school?

Dr. Joe: It’s hard to say as I loved all the classes that were STEM. I was good at Maths, so I always enjoyed those classes and projects. In one class we were devising an experiment to measure the acceleration of a rocket and then launching the rocket to test it which was really cool.

Dr. Joe studying early on in her STEM life.

GSHPA: What is your current career and how do you use your interests on a day-to-day basis?

Dr. Joe: I trained on the edge of Physics and Engineering, building and designing instruments for new missions. This got me started in the Science area and just recently I move to help lead the Engineering organization. My job now is to help decide what technologies are needed to answer science questions of the future, like are we alone and to help understand our own planet. All of this is fascinating, looking for answers to questions.

Dr. Joe Hill-Kittle at the launch site (Cape Canaveral) for the Magnetic Multiscale Mission (MMS)

GSHPA: Working with rockets, and new technology is pretty exciting for us to hear about. What gets you excited about what you do?

Dr. Joe: Who doesn’t like launching rockets, trying to save the planet and learning about the whole universe? I love all of it. We get to design missions that will help us understand climate change and provide early disaster warnings for fires and hurricanes, missions that will help us understand the very beginnings of the universe and search for other Earth’s outside of our Solar System, build instruments that will look for life on planets in our solar system and help us understand our Sun.

GSHPA: What is your favorite thing about your current job and what do you find the most challenging?

Dr. Joe: My favourite thing is thinking about what we can do in the future and how we get there. The biggest challenge is bringing change to a big organization. It can be very slow and frustrating but if you have a team around you to rally each other on, it can also be very rewarding when you start to see the results of your efforts.

Dr. Joe standing in front of the James Webb Space Telescope at Goddard, which will launch in December of this year.

GSHPA: Girls are facing challenges and successes every day in their STEM journeys. What advice would you give to girls interested in a career in STEM?

Dr. Joe: Study hard, look for opportunities like internships to get some experience so you can figure out what you like and don’t like and what interests you.

GSHPA: What can we do to have more girls/women in science like you?

Dr. Joe: Dream big! Encourage each other. Believe in yourselves. I was fortunate to have mentors encouraging me along the way. Look for opportunities and encourage girls and women to apply.

GSHPA: For girls who are now starting in STEM, what skills will help them in their journeys?

Dr. Joe: There are so many opportunities for everyone at NASA, from turning wrenches, writing software to model the Earth, building instruments. One of the common skills that is important, and you will get from Girl Scouts is team leadership and building teams. Understanding how to listen to everyone’s inputs before making a decision. You don’t have to be the smartest person in the room but you do have to be smart enough and open enough to listen and value everyone’s ideas to get the best solutions

GSHPA: How does your work at NASA and in the community, help encourage more diversity in STEM fields?

Dr. Joe: I hope by sharing my story people will see their own opportunity. I also spend time advocating for diverse applicant pools for opportunities and look for leadership opportunities for minorities to get the experience needed to move into more senior positions.

GSHPA: Would you say that the environment has changed since you started in STEM? What would be different for girls now?

Dr. Joe: There are already more women in STEM than when I started and that’s great. There is also recognition that barriers do exist, and we need to break them down. We are not done yet but at least there is awareness of the challenges so we can start to address them.

GSHPA: What message do you have for girls and women in STEM?

Dr. Joe: Don’t hold back, you can do more than you think!

GSHPA: Thank you Dr. Joe we look forward to watching the launch of the the James Webb Space Telescope this December and thinking about all the things we steps we can take to do fun and exciting things in the STEM world.

28 New Girl Scout Badges for all Ages!

We are excited to introduce you to 28 new badges for Girl Scouts of all ages.

You can become a digital activist, make your own Cookie Business plan, and explore the natural world around you through math.  It is time to try something new.  Girl Scouts will have the opportunity to take new adventures with these 28 new badges in Math in Nature, Entrepreneurship, and Digital Leadership, along with new Global Action Awards.  No matter their passions, Girl Scouts will find a way to break new ground and share their experiences. 

See the new badges below with the dates we are offering badge days and as always take a look at the Badge Explorer to start planning.

The Brand New Badges

New for All Levels

All Girl Scouts in grades K-12 can now earn Digital Leadership and Cookie Business badges.

6 Digital Leadership Badges

Sponsored by Instagram

Girl Scouts of all ages who are looking to explore the power of being online and social media will find the Digital Leadership badges for them.  They will learn to be safe online and manage their screen time, create a social impact and become a digital activist, and connect with their communities, local and global.

Check out GSHPA’s Event list to sign up for our Virtual Badge Days focusing on Digital Leadership.

13 Cookie Business Badges

Daisies to Ambassadors will be challenged to think outside the cookie booth to become Cookie Goal Setters, Bosses, and Influencers.  Digital sales and marketing are just a part of all the new curriculum to help the girls learn how to make the most of their cookie season and the Digital Cookie platform.

2 Global Action Awards Badges

There are now two new major awards for all levels of Girl Scouts: World Thinking Day Award and Global Action Award.  Girl Scouts will be able to start their global impact with these awards, one for each level.

New for Daisies, Brownies, and Juniors

Girls Scouts in grades K-5 can now earn brand-new Math in Nature badges.

9 Math in Nature Badges

Sponsored by Johnson & Johnson

Girls are going to get outdoors and explore the world around them through nature and math all at once.  These new badges will help Daisies, Brownies, and Juniors discover the links of science and nature, including, the Fibonacci sequence, patterns, and so much more.

Getting Started Today!

Girl Scouts in the Heart of PA are ready for you to try these out we have Badge workshops scheduled for a selection of these new badges that you can sign up for virtually and in person

GSUSA has free self-guided activities available online through Girl Scouts at Home.

You can also access the Volunteer Toolkit, for a variety of programming, including troop meeting plans, tips for volunteers, and other resources.

Explore all of these amazing new badges online using the Awards and Badge Explorer.